Codons
Codons
Codons

© the artist. Image credit: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

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This mobile sculpture is made up of the four DNA nucleotides, A (adenine), C (cytosine), T (thymine), G (guanine), that carry all of our genetic information. The colours are those used in the output of automatic DNA sequencing machines. The nucleotides are arranged into all possible variants of the DNA nucleotide triplet 'codons' which are the instructions our bodies use to turn the DNA code into protein. The sculpture takes the form of a helix, with increasing division to represent the role of DNA in cell division and reproduction. Judith Glynn is a Professor of Infectious Disease Epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Her sculptures depict human life and interactions in a variety of media, and are held in collections across Europe.

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

London

Title

Codons

Date

2016

Medium

wire & resin

Measurements

H 300 x W 100 x D 100 cm (E)

Accession number

ART12

Work type

Sculpture

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Normally on display at

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine

Keppel Street, London, Greater London WC1E 7HT England

Not all locations are open to the public. Please contact the gallery or collection for more information
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